Whitcliffe Common, situated on the southern edge of Ludlow in South Shropshire is a wonderful recreation area for residents and visitors alike.

It is maintained by Friends of Whitcliffe Common in close conjunction with the leaseholders, Shropshire Wildlife Trust, so that future generations can enjoy this beautiful area.

View from Toposcope

View from Toposcope

The Common is the remnant of a much larger medieval common, use of which was acquired by the burgesses of Ludlow before 1241. Here they grazed livestock, gathered hay and brushwood and quarried stone. Whitcliffe later became a fashionable promenade overlooking the River Teme and the town of Ludlow. It is still a valued recreational facility where people can walk and enjoy the wonderful views.


It is rare to have so much variety of interest in one area. In addition to being an enjoyable place to visit there are also two sites of Special Scientific Interest

The banks of the Teme contain a number of geological sites of world importance, with the name ‘Ludlow’ being given to the period of geological time used throughout the world for strata laid down between 423 and 419 million years ago, towards the end of the period known as the Silurian. Our Geology page gives more information about the origins of the area.

The River Teme is equally valued for its river flora and fauna.

Vital woodland management is undertaken for the long-term well being of the trees and grassland and also the safety of the people using the Common.
Recent work on the common has included –  

  • tree surgery to make the main routes safe for walkers.
  • thinning the trees to allow the remaining trees to grow larger.
  • opening up of the views over Ludlow.
  • restoring the footpaths and steps.
  • cutting the grassland area once a year with all grass removed in order to increase the numbers of wild flowers.

Foxgloves on Whitcliffe